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SCAMMERS! SCAMMERS!

Photo by Lindsey LaMont on Unsplash

Getting funded is a pain in the ass and recently a new scam is hitting founders with little experience with cryptocurrency.

I’ve tried my hardest to simplify this but there may be some terminology that isn’t clear. All you have to understand is this: if you don’t know how to control a cryptocurrency wallet securely, do not take investment in cryptocurrency.

I am writing this because I’ve seen people hurt by this scam and the companies in question did nothing. This is a warning for anyone in the same position.

The scam goes like this: you, the founder, might be running a fundraise or doing an equity funding round. The scammers will target users on Fundable, for example, and explain that they are very interested in your product and are willing to fund your entire round in crypto. …


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Photo by Magnet.me on Unsplash

The following is an excerpt from my new book, Get Funded!, available now. Need a copy? Want to write a review? Ping me on Twitter @johnbiggs!

The answer to that burning question keeps founders up at night–literally. Coming home after a full day of work to build another product is exhausting, and not many can maintain the pace. But entrepreneurs with families, at least in the US, need insurance and a steady paycheck. The mortgage won’t wait for your success.

Quitting your day job is a difficult decision, but there are a few guidelines to remember.

First, you need to assess your business in terms of potential earnings. Will you make more if you spend more time on your business? This is called scaling, and the first point of contact with scaling happens when you, the founder, pour yourself into the work. Perhaps try it for a week, spending a few vacation days focused only on your startup. Are you making anything at all? What’s holding you back? What is the opportunity cost? If you are wasting away in a cubicle doing nothing all day, maybe there is a good reason for a change. …


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South Brooklyn is quiet. Where there was once an endless chaos of cars and trucks rolling up Sixth Avenue onto the highway, now there is only the expected. The morning begins with a lost Leviathan calling in the fog, a ship coming up an empty river under a silent bridge. Birds come next, in this city of perches, chirping and skittering in the ivy outside our home. The next few hours are tedious with the sound of truck tires hitting a single metal plate in the street outside.

And then we hear the distant sirens, high and lonesome in the empty streets. …


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All the glamor of an office without the bad coffee.

I’ve been working from home for twenty years. At this point in my career I actually like going into an office once in a while, if only for the free snacks, but I would never commute nor would I go in if I didn’t have an absolute need, like a video shoot or something that required my physical presence.

Working from home isn’t for everybody, but it may soon be. Given the vagaries of real estate, the growing failure of office startups, and the general post-millennial attitude that a job is a lifestyle, you’ll probably be sitting at home sooner than you think. Plus, there are mass plagues that will kill you if you get on the train.

So we’ll stay home. But staying home is hard.

So how did I survive?

Here are few tips I’ve learned over the years.

Make a place for yourself — You need a place where you can go in your home. You cannot work from home on your dining room table or from bed. Never post up on the couch. Working from home isn’t a vacation, it’s work. If you don’t have any space in your home then go to a cafe that is lax about their loitering privileges or even head out to the library.

The bottom line is that you need a spot that is your own, disconnected from family, pets, and distractions. Don’t do anything in this space you wouldn’t do at work. Don’t turn on the TV, don’t blast heavy metal. …


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The original “dude bitching about disconnection” book.

Two things made me start thinking about the current state of social media. Both happened today. First, my daughter came in this morning crying that she couldn’t access her account on Tik Tok that had 315 views and 10 followers. She had used the wrong email and was upset she couldn’t get into this font of potential virality.

She wanted the power back. She was frustrated she couldn’t have it.

Second, I saw this sodden, slow-burn of a video at HQ where the hosts got drunk and told the world what they really felt. …


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One of my favorite things about the past few days has been walking by my daughter’s school and seeing the little guys and girls who need a lot of special help in come out of their bus into the waiting arms of their teachers. The teachers scrum around the bus doors like fans at a concert and they grab their charges and hug them and high five them and lead them, smiling, into the building.

Watching this I’m reminded of a few things. First, that these teachers actually exist. People who will help a blind boy read or a quiet girl speak. Who will help a boy who can’t walk well stand on the shoulders of giants. …


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Building a Slackbot is surprisingly easy and I wanted one that would send RSS feeds to a special room. This, I discovered, was a bit hard. This is why I wanted to share some of my work here.

The first trick is to get your Slack API key. This is found here and requires you create a Bot user and then grab the key. It is a fairly long string and starts with “xoxp.”

The instructions for API key generation are here.

Once you have your token, simply place it in the code below where it says “YOUR API TOKEN.” …


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If you want to stay sane do the following:

  1. Delete social media apps from your phone. This forces you to go to the official websites, all of which are hot garbage. In this way you turn Facebook and Twitter into read only access points and/or broadcast mediums. If you are not a public figure or trying to sell something you should consider social media a parasite and not worth engagement.
  2. Use TweetDeleter to delete all your old Tweets. There are some people out there who believe Twitter is akin to the Library of Congress and that their zingers should be kept for posterity. Get over yourself. Delete that shit. Anything on social media that is older than 24 hours is food for robots who want to sell you something. …


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I write and transcribe for a living. You don’t. You run a cool startup or you sell cupcakes or you do something else. But you have to write. You have to explain to the world what you’re thinking. Here’s how.

Step 1 — Figure out why you’re writing. Few people ever do this. I get requests all the time to “write posts for Forbes.” This is wrong. Getting a post in Forbes or on TechCrunch or anywhere else is as useful as posting on Medium. Nobody notices your byline and barring some miracle of writing they won’t remember your message. The goal of writing online is to establish yourself as an expert in a your space. …


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Photo by Norbu Gyachung on Unsplash

In 1932 a journalist named Fritz Gerlich took over a popular weekly paper in Germany and renamed it the Der Gerade Weg — the Straight Path. His work over the next two years called out the rise of Hilter in Germany. His thesis was simple: National Socialism — the Nazi party — would bring about “Enmity with neighbouring nations, tyranny internally, civil war, world war, lies, hatred, fratricide and boundless want.”

A year later, after the Nazi rise to power, police arrested Gerlich and sent him to Dachau. They murdered him on June 30, 1934. …

About

John Biggs

Writer And Entrepreneur

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